It has been said that   “Jesus has a strict immigration policy”. The bible speaks of two moral duties when it comes to helping the foreigner and we can’t do one without the other.

What does charity require us to do? The fist  duty is to welcome the foreigner to the extent we are able. We have an obligation to help those truly in need to the extent we have the ability to do so. Does that mean that you must bring the  homeless man asking for help to sleep in your home? Remember the Good Samaritan was good and commended by Christ. The Good Samaritan did the right thing: humanitarian aid.  He did not take the roadside victim home with him. Rather, the Good Samaritan put the victim up in a hotel and paid for him to get better.

Our second duty is to secure one’s border and enforce the law for the sake of the common good of all people. Do you lock your doors at night while your children sleep? Or do you leave them wide open for anyone who may enter, no matter what their intent,  risking  good of your children to anyone who demands that you allow them in?

There is a time to build bridges and a time to build walls. The  truth  is that walls, like locked doors or fences, aren’t bad in and of themselves. There is an appropriate time and place for them and, as William Kilpatrick points out, sometimes wall are even merciful !

” Pope Francis declared Friday that “every country has the right to control its borders,” especially where the risk of terrorism exists.”

“In several places, the Bible acknowledges the importance of walls. In the Book of Revelation, the Holy City of Jerusalem is described as being surrounded with “a great, high wall” (Rev 21: 12). And in Isaiah, the Lord says:

Upon your walls, O Jerusalem, I have set watchmen. (Is 62: 6)” -William Kilpatrick

Jesus said, There was a landowner who planted a vineyard. He put a wall around it, dug a winepress in it and built a watchtower.

“Why do you need watchmen? To keep an eye out for enemies, of course. The Old Testament authors took the existence of enemies for granted. So did Jesus. He mentions enemies on several occasions. Moreover, in the parable of the householder and the thieves, he acknowledges the legitimacy of defending one’s house against break-ins (Mt 24: 43). That would seem to imply that walls and bolted doors are not necessarily unreasonable.” -William Kilpatrick

We have a moral  duty  “to welcome the foreigner out of charity and respect for the human person. Persons have the right to immigrate and thus government must accommodate this right to the greatest extent possible, especially financially blessed nations: “The more prosperous nations are obliged, to the extent they are able, to welcome the foreigner in search of the security and the means of livelihood which he cannot find in his country of origin. Public authorities should see to it that the natural right is respected that places a guest under the protection of those who receive him.” Catholic Catechism, 2241.

We also have a second duty  “to secure one’s border and enforce the law for the sake of the common good. Sovereign nations have the right to enforce their laws and all persons must respect the legitimate exercise of this right: “Political authorities, for the sake of the common good for which they are responsible may make the exercise of the right to immigrate subject to various juridical conditions, especially with regard to the immigrants’ duties toward their country of adoption. Immigrants are obliged to respect with gratitude the material and spiritual heritage of the country that receives them, to obey its laws and to assist in carrying civic burdens.” Catholic Catechism, 2241.

“The U.S. Catholic Bishops accept the legitimate role of the U.S. government in intercepting unauthorized migrants who attempt to travel to the United States. The Bishops also believe that by increasing lawful means for migrants to enter, live, and work in the United States, law enforcement will be better able to focus upon those who truly threaten public safety: drug and human traffickers, smugglers, and would‐be terrorists. Any enforcement measures must be targeted, proportional, and humane.”

But comprehensive immigration reform need to carries out both moral duties! These are examples of how to fulfill both:

Earned Legalization: An earned legalization program would allow foreign nationals of good moral character who are living in the United States to apply to adjust their status to obtain lawful permanent residence.

Future Worker Program: A worker program to permit foreign‐born workers to enter the country safely and legally would help reduce illegal immigration and the loss of life in the American desert. Any program should include workplace protections, living wage levels, safeguards against the displacement of U.S. workers, and family unity.

Family‐based Immigration Reform: It currently takes years for family members to be reunited through the family‐based legal immigration system. This leads to family breakdown and, in some cases, illegal immigration. Changes in family‐based immigration should be made to increase the number of family visas available and reduce family reunification waiting times.

Restoration of Due Process Rights: Due process rights taken away by the 1996 Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA) should be restored. For example, the three and ten year bars to reentry should be eliminated.

Addressing Root Causes: Congress should examine the root causes of migration, such as under‐development and poverty in sending countries, and seek long‐term solutions. The antidote to the problem of illegal immigration is sustainable economic development in sending countries. In an ideal world, migration should be driven by choice, not necessity.

Enforcement: The U.S. Catholic Bishops accept the legitimate role of the U.S. government in intercepting unauthorized migrants who attempt to travel to the United States. The Bishops also believe that by increasing lawful means for migrants to enter, live, and work in the United States, law enforcement will be better able to focus upon those who truly threaten public safety: drug and human traffickers, smugglers, and would‐be terrorists. Any enforcement measures must be targeted, proportional, and humane.-U.S. Catholic Bishops

While the media has fueled hysteria by falsely claiming that President Trump’s Executive Order is a “Muslim ban”,  some of the fear can be attributed to poor communication about the Order as pointed out in Persons first: Refugees, Immigrants and Executive Orders

Archbishop Jose H. Gomez points out  that “We all agree that our nation has the obligation to secure its borders and establish criteria for who is permitted to enter and how long they are permitted to stay. In a post-9/11 world, we all agree there are people both inside and outside our borders who want to hurt us. We share a common concern for our nation’s security and the safety of our loved ones. That does not make these orders less troubling. Halting admissions of refugees for 90 or 120 days may not seem like a long time. But for a family fleeing a war-torn nation, or the violence of drug cartels, or warlords who force even children into armies — this could mean the difference between life and death.”

Truth that matters in our response to  suffering people. The truth is that there are refugees who desperately  need help and justice and there are refugees that intend harm.  The suffering is real for  refugees in crisis and for people who have been harmed and killed by militant refugees. Let’s ask ourselves hard questions. Do we only care about refugees when they fit our political agenda or are we giving our money and/or our time  to organizations that serve their needs like this?  Do our political beliefs consider how to provide true  justice and compassion for foreigners, refugees, orphans and widows while also fulfilling the obligation project the common good?

These are questions I have asked myself and I encourage other Christians to do the same. I welcome respectful dialogue. We can learn from each other and challenge each other in finding the best ways to “welcome the foreigner”. If we only care about refugees who are suffering and not the people who have been harmed by militant refugees, we’ve got it wrong.

If we turn away people in need based solely on fear, we’ve got it wrong.

If we insist that we take on more refugees than our country can handle, we’ve got it wrong.

If we pontificate about the good that we should be doing and don’t do it, we’ve got it wrong.

Charity, justice  and respect for human persons requires bridges sometimes and walls other times. The wise will seek to know the difference.